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hippiearcheologist:

myramylove:

I don’t think I can do any of these.

And I’m here like

   

Source: cosmopolitan.com
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tastefullyoffensive:

"I neuter was something wrong with this." [x]

tastefullyoffensive:

"I neuter was something wrong with this." [x]

Source: tastefullyoffensive
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cheese3d:

i think i can accurately say that i can crush a man’s head with my thighs

(via tastefullyoffensive)

Source: cheese3d
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jasonwongart:

Speed animation 164

Today i had a little stomach ache so i thought that i’d animate it.  sometimes you have gas and you just need to release… not saying that was the case today, but this was a fun animation to do.  took me about an hour and 20 minutes.

I’d also like to thank those of you that have been following and checking out my work.  I got some nice comments on my work the other day and i really appreciate it!! thanks for the support!!

Source: jasonwongart
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asylum-art:

Spectacular colour  into this arid Utah desert by Guy Tal

"Every few years, for a few fleeting days, when conditions are just right, these otherwise arid lands burst into color with carpets of Scorpionweed and Beeplant." - Utah’s badlands"

The Badlands region in the American West is famous (or infamous) for its arid and unforgiving landscape, which is decorated by sharp and eroded spires of stone. If you catch it at just the right moment and in the right conditions, however, these apparent wastelands can give birth to an extraordinary explosion of color and life in the form of beautiful wildflowers.

(via ajaegerpilot)

Source: asylum-art
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

From 29 Satellie Photos That Will Change Your Perspective On Planet Earth

1. 53.0066°N 7.1920°E. Bourtange is a village with a population of 430 in the municipality of Vlagtwedde in the Netherlands. The star fort was built in 1593 during the Eighty Years’ War when William I of Orange wanted to control the only road between Germany and the city of Groningen. Bourtange was restored to its mid-18th-century state in 1960 and is currently used as an open-air museum.

2. 40°46’56”N; 73°57’55”W. Central Park in New York City spans 843 acres. That’s 6% of the island of Manhattan.

3. 41°23′27″N 2°09′47″E. Barcelona, Spain.

4. 5°26′15″N 12°20′9″E. Venice, Italy

5. 31.079844, -97.80145. In 2013, there were 923,400 home construction projects in the United States. Killeen, Texas.

6. 36.211001, -115.266914. The Desert Shores Community in Las Vegas, Nevada contains 3,351 units and four man-made lakes. Las Vegas, Nevada

7. 25°50′17″N 50°36′18″E. Durrat Al Bahrain will consist of 15 connected, artificial islands (including six atolls, five fish-shaped, and two crescent-shaped). Construction costs are estimated at $6 billion and the project is slated for completion in mid-2015. Bahrain.

8. 5°40′S 52°44′W. Clearcutting operations in the Amazon Rainforest of Para, Brazil branch out from one of the state’s central roads. Pará, Brazil.

9. 32.170890°N 110.855184°W. Tucson, Arizona.

10. 36.78234°N 2.74315°W. Plasticulture refers to the practice of using plastic materials in agricultural applications. This is visible in the plains and valleys of Almeria, Spain where nearly 20,000 hectares are covered by these greenhouse structures. Almeria, Spain

(via dunderklumpen)

Source: darksilenceinsuburbia
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joannechocolat:

Another day, another lazy assumption. This time it’s someone on Twitter, describing himself as a reviewer and would-be author, making a passing comment about THE GOSPEL OF LOKI.

I’m not going to point anyone in the direction of the tweeter. He isn’t the first to say something crass, and I’m sure he didn’t mean his remark to be as insulting and dismissive as it sounded. However, the tweet (which was also posted on Goodreads) went as follows: 

Reading The Gospel of Loki. Capitalizing on the fandom of Tom Hiddleston I imagine.”

Seriously?

Meh.

Perhaps it got me on a bad day. Writers sometimes have them too. Perhaps it was just one too many reader assumptions. Either way, it pissed me off more than such comments usually do.

Last week I came across a long, highly inaccurate (and rather badly-spelt) Twitter conversation, in which two young women accused me of “plagiarizing” and “copying” the Norse myths, or rather the version written down in the Prose Edda by the 12th-century scholar Snorri Sturlusson - rather an inaccurate use of the term, but plagiarism is an accusation that authors should (and do) take very seriously. It cannot refer to the use of a myth or folk-tale (if it did, then Disney would be in deep trouble with Perrault and the Brothers Grimm), but even with no foundation, it’s an accusation designed to put an author’s back up.

Not long before that, I got a rabid, rambling e-mail from someone who then posted the same text on Amazon as a review, accusing me of “capitalizing” (that word again), this time on the popularity of Johnny Depp, without whom (the writer said) THE LOLLIPOP SHOES and PEACHES FOR MONSIEUR LE CURE would never have been written.

There are, of course, several things wrong with this line of argument. One, CHOCOLAT was already a best-seller before the movie was made, which means that my readers - that is, the readers who have been with me from the start, and who follow me, not Hollywood - had already voted with their feet, and needed no further persuasion to read about Vianne Rocher, Roux and Anouk. In the same way, my first LOKI book (RUNEMARKS) had already been published four years before Marvel’s THOR came out, which means, barring covert timey-wimey activity, that Tom Hiddleston’s Loki fandom wasn’t around for me to capitalize on.

So, why am I dwelling on this? Well, I think it’s the tip of an iceberg - an iceberg we glimpse so often that we tend to forget it’s even there; a great big iceberg of sexism within the whole book industry, which stealthily perpetuates the belief that no woman writer can ever really be successful without having somehow copied from, used or otherwise capitalized upon the popularity of a man.

Don’t buy it? Try this: 

Imagine someone accusing Salman Rushdie of “capitalizing” on the folk tales of the Middle East.

Imagine someone accusing Neil Gaiman of “capitalizing” on the popularity of: Norse myths; DR WHO; Claire Danes; milk.

Imagine someone accusing Lee Child of “capitalizing” on the popularity of Tom Cruise. 

No? Didn’t think so.

As for myself, I can’t even remember all the crazy, sexist assumptions that have been made (and voiced) about me during my career as a writer. Here are just a few of them:

My husband supported me financially while I was starting out. (He didn’t. We both had jobs.)

My husband secretly writes my books. (Oh, for fuck’s sake.)

My media, university or Hollywood connections helped me start off. (They didn’t. I don’t have any.)

I’m sleeping with my agent/editor. (One is gay, the other female. And no, I’m really not.)

I’m desperate to make more movies, to boost my writing career. (Nope. Much as I like movies, I’ve never needed a leg-up from Hollywood. That’s why I keep turning down offers.)

I only write for women. Because, you know - vagina. (Nope. I write for anyone with a pulse.)

We know that the book industry is largely unfair to women. Women writers are in the majority, but generally get smaller advances; fewer reviews; fewer prizes; less respect. 

It doesn’t help when Peter Stothard, latterly a Booker judge and editor of the Times Literary Supplement, excuses the fact that books reviewed in the TLS are almost all by male writers by saying that women don’t read, (or, presumably write) the kind of books reviewed in the TLS. 

It doesn’t help when Nobel Prize winner V. S. Naipaul opines (as he does, with monotonous frequency) that women are simply not intellectually up to writing great literature (being way too full of feelings and general messy thinking).

It doesn’t help when women themselves perpetuate the use of insulting terms like “chick-lit”, which belittle and marginalize women’s writing.

It doesn’t help when “women’s fiction” is still considered a sub-category. (Amazon; Goodreads; Wikipedia; take note.)

It doesn’t help when some (male) academics teaching English Literature teach male-dominated courses, and where (female) academics have to compensate by creating “women’s fiction” courses, as if women were a minority group, and not half the population. 

Recently, at a function at my local university, I was told - with some pride - by an academic that he never read books by women. It doesn’t help that morons like this are still in charge where it matters.

Given how many influential people (most of them male) are still disseminating the myth that women can’t get there on their own; that women are okay writing for women, but that men need something more durable; that women read (and write) commercial fiction, but that men write literature, we’re going to keep getting people making the same assumptions.The trickle-down effect of sexism in the book business will continue to apply, on Goodreads, on Twitter, in bookshops, on blogs. 

How can we stop it?

Don’t let it go. Don’t assume that your voice isn’t worth listening to. Call people out when they talk crap instead of slinking sadly away.

And please, everyone, say after me:

Women’s fiction is not a “genre”.

Women writers do not need the permission of men to write what they do.

Women writers do not need to ride on the coat-tails of men to achieve success.

Women writers are capable of thinking, writing, and acting for themselves, without a man to motivate them, to give them ideas or to lend them an air of authority.

Women writers don’t need to take male pseudonyms in order to gain more readers.

Women writers don’t need to scorn and belittle other women writers in order to get the approval of men.

Women writers can stand alone. But it helps if we stand together.

Well worth the read, stick with it

Source: joannechocolat
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The internet just changed: Net Neutrality is dead.

lizwuzthere:

feigenbaumsworld:

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Last Wednesday, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler announced a proposal for new rules that would allow for a “ fast lane” of Internet traffic for content providers who are willing (and able) to pay a fee. [1] The proposal reverses the FCC’s previous commitment to net neutrality and open internet and allows ISP’s like Comcast or Verizon to slow down and censor services that don’t pay the toll.

We have to be totally honest, this situation is seriously grim. But there is still hope. The FCC already knows that the Internet community wants net neutrality, but they think they can put their spin on these new rules and sneak them through. If we can prove them wrong right now with a massive public outcry, we can literally save the Internet once again.

We need to stop the FCC now. Big business groups are already ramping up lobbying efforts with the FCC in swarms since Wednesday’s announcement in support of censoring the open Internet and to ensure this dangerous proposal moves forward. [2]

This is a critical moment. In the last few weeks more than 65,000 people have taken action with us. Can you help us get to 80,000 by the end of the day today?

[1] Gautham Nagesh. “FCC to Propose New ‘Net Neutrality’ Rules”.
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702304518704579519963416350296

[2] Edward Wyatt. Edward Wyatt. “Lobbying Efforts Intensify After F.C.C. Tries 3rd Time on Net Neutrality” http://www.nytimes.com/2014/04/25/business/lobbying-efforts-intensify-after-fcc-tries-3rd-time-on-net-neutrality.html?hpw&rref=politics

 

Here’s some extra (also important) information:

The chairman of the FCC, Tom Wheeler, was previously a lobbyist for the cable and wireless industry. This revolving door our government has with large corporations and their lobbyists is what leads to these kind of policy disasters which crush the competition of big businesses and devastate our individual freedoms.
Net Neutrality is important. Very VERY important.
But it’s just going to keep coming under fire again and again unless we address the underlying problem and that is the corrupting influence of money in our politics. 28th Amendment, anyone?

Having said that SIGN THE PETITION. We gotta do what we can at the moment.

(via goldspandexleggings)

Source: feigenbaumsworld
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ryanseacrest:

TUMBLE TO UNLOCK: Big Little Lions’ “Here And Now”
The song will unlock once this post earns 100 Tumbles/100 Followers!
10 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT THE BAND
1. Helen used to be a stand up comedian and has toured with Eddie Izzard.
2. Paul’s great aunt was a country singer in the the 1930’s, 40’s and 50’s who went by the name Dixie Dale.
3. Helen’s teenage daughter plays fiddle on one of the EP tracks.
4. Paul taught himself guitar at age 17 by using good ole’ Mel Bay’s Guitar book.
5. At age 12, Paul was hired to breakdance in a commercial. 
6. Helen moved to Vancouver island so she could ski as much as possible.
7. Helen and Paul have only met once.
8. Paul and his brother Brian, on the way to an out of town gig, had their SUV break down, made it to a dealership, traded the truck in, bought a new SUV, and made it to the gig only a few minutes late.
9. There is a dude wearing a Paul Otten Band t-shirt in the Red Hot Chili Pepper’s video for “Snow (Hey Oh).” 
10. Helen married her husband on a whim after knowing him for a few weeks so he could stay in the UK. They have been married for over 20 years.

ryanseacrest:

TUMBLE TO UNLOCK: Big Little Lions’ “Here And Now”

The song will unlock once this post earns 100 Tumbles/100 Followers!

10 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW ABOUT THE BAND

1. Helen used to be a stand up comedian and has toured with Eddie Izzard.

2. Paul’s great aunt was a country singer in the the 1930’s, 40’s and 50’s who went by the name Dixie Dale.

3. Helen’s teenage daughter plays fiddle on one of the EP tracks.

4. Paul taught himself guitar at age 17 by using good ole’ Mel Bay’s Guitar book.

5. At age 12, Paul was hired to breakdance in a commercial.

6. Helen moved to Vancouver island so she could ski as much as possible.

7. Helen and Paul have only met once.

8. Paul and his brother Brian, on the way to an out of town gig, had their SUV break down, made it to a dealership, traded the truck in, bought a new SUV, and made it to the gig only a few minutes late.

9. There is a dude wearing a Paul Otten Band t-shirt in the Red Hot Chili Pepper’s video for “Snow (Hey Oh).” 

10. Helen married her husband on a whim after knowing him for a few weeks so he could stay in the UK. They have been married for over 20 years.

Source: ryanseacrest
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fuckyeahtattoos:

Done by Daniel Gulick

Tulsa, OK

Source: fuckyeahtattoos
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thanks for the adventures

(via wilwheaton)

Source: lovotes